Good news
Features

This year in good news: looking back on the impact of our readers

A book's popularity surged, a barbershop saw unsolicited gifts, a fundraiser raised $30k and much more, thanks to Good Newsletter readers

By Emily Fagan
December 24, 2021
Good news
Features

This year in good news: looking back on the impact of our readers

A book's popularity surged, a barbershop saw unsolicited gifts, a fundraiser raised $30k and much more, thanks to Good Newsletter readers

By Emily Fagan
Dec 24, 2021
Good news
Features

This year in good news: looking back on the impact of our readers

A book's popularity surged, a barbershop saw unsolicited gifts, a fundraiser raised $30k and much more, thanks to Good Newsletter readers

By Emily Fagan
December 24, 2021
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This year in good news: looking back on the impact of our readers

As we look back on the good news of this past year, I have a confession to make. There are some stories we haven’t been telling you—ones that file into my inbox on a regular basis, full of positive tales and gratitude for the community we live in.

I’m talking about the many stories of how readers of the Good Newsletter—and Capital Daily as a whole—have impacted Greater Victoria. With many stories shared in the Good Newsletter, our readers go on to create good news of their own by uplifting and supporting the community members and organizations we feature. 

It’s time to share the impact you’ve had, to thank you and remind you in difficult times of the great things you’re capable of. 

Victoria-based Susan Sanford Blades's debut novel, Fake It So Real, earns awards and nominations

“Being in the Good Newsletter had a huge impact on Fake It So Real,” said Victoria-based author Susan Sanford Blades.

After the story about her debut novel ran in the Good Newsletter, she says the book went from having five holds at the Greater Victoria Public Library to more than 70 holds. In response, the library system decided to expand from having two copies of the book to adding one for every branch (plus too at the Nellie McClung branch)—for a total of 13 copies.

For a few weeks, Fake It So Real was included on the Greater Victoria Public Library’s recommended reads list on their website.

Sanford Blades said that local bookstores sold out of all their copies of the book, making it temporarily as scarce as yeast and toilet paper in March 2020.

“Independently published books don’t often get a lot of attention, and I am extremely grateful,” Sanford Blades said.

Festival Afloat raises funds for Site C legal challenge

Thanks to support from Capital Daily readers and other members of the community, the Festival Afloat concert series raised more than $30,000 for the West Moberly First Nation's legal challenge to Site C dam.

In a blog post about the concert series, Andrea Palframan from RAVEN Trust wrote that the turnout at local semi-aquatic events went beyond what they had expected.

“Our two little shows in Victoria made a big splash for Indigenous justice,” Palframan wrote.

Fair hair: Community Salon’s ‘hair bank’ provides barrier-free haircuts to Victoria locals

Since his salon’s free haircut “hair bank” was featured in Capital Daily, owner Jamie McCallum was nominated for two Chamber of Commerce social impact awards. He went on to win the Synergy Systems Social Impact Award, presented by Mayor Lisa Helps and sponsored by the City of Victoria.

“Having the article and podcast is still bringing in new clients and with new clients comes new awareness and new donations,” McCallum said. “Surprisingly, there were a few anonymous donations that came directly through my email account directly after the article.”

Through the story, McCallum has also been able to connect with local social workers. They have put him in touch with their clients, to help more people take advantage of his free and paid services. 

Two partners in community health to launch new wellness centre

The Victoria Community Health Co-op and Cook Street Village Activity Centre are now nearly finished refurbishing the space that will soon be the new wellness centre.

They’ve found the outpouring of support from readers very uplifting over the past two months.

“Several people have mentioned [the] story, SO helpful,” wrote Vanessa Hammond, chairperson and a cofounder of Victoria Community Health Co-op in an email.

The co-op is currently interviewing additional nurses to add to the wellness centre’s services, along with working on a comprehensive schedule of health and wellness events.

How the grassroots Community Laundry Program is making a difference with free, fresh loads

The Community Laundry Program is still going strong. They have typically survived by receiving several small grants, but as the funding from those grants is no longer active, they are now solely running on community support.

“It is precarious being a little local program because we aren't ever guaranteed our funding and don't have all the same resources as the big guys in the field,” the Community Laundry Program wrote to Capital Daily.

“People really want our service to remain in the community and to see us succeed; this is so special for us. Without fail, folks come out of the woodwork to us with donations of money and laundry soap. We are honored to be part of such a helping collective in this city.”

The small Community Laundry Project team said that although they run the project, it belongs to the community, and expressed their gratitude for those that have helped keep their doors open.

A Victoria 10-year-old created a word for a linguistic oddity. Over the past four years, it’s come to mean so much more

Lucky Budd, father of levidrome inventor Levi Budd, says that he has long kept his son out of the direct spotlight of this story by not allowing him to be interviewed. Levi was six years old when he first invented the word, which quickly became an international hit. 

For the first time ever, 10-year-old Levi shared his own thoughts on his experience with levidromes publicly in his interview this summer with Capital Daily.

“It made him feel very proud to talk about the journey his word has been on over the last four years,” Lucky said. “It has been such a positive experience and as we all deal with the tough times of the last few years, focusing on a feel good story is good for all of us!”

To the Budd family, it’s been exciting to see how one idea—and a lot of initiative—can cause a ripple effect across the globe.

That article is a finalist for the Canadian Online Publishing Awards, which will be announced in February.

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Capital Daily readers have raised over $100,000 for the United Way in the Holiday Donation Drive

If you’re looking for ways to have even more impact this holiday season, the Holiday Donation Drive will be going on through the holiday period. 

We’re hoping to raise $150,000 for the United Way’s Neighbourhood Houses—some of which have been featured in the Good Newsletter for their positive effects on young Victorians and their families—and we’re already two-thirds of the way there. Every donation is matched, so your impact is doubled. You can donate here.

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